Verbal Aspect Resources

I’m glad to see people were interested in the keeping up your Greek post that included discussion of Greek verbal aspect. The question of resources arose, for which I’m thankful.

For a long time it has seemed that most of the work produced has been very technical and introductory grammars have been slow to incorporate current models of verbal aspect. This may be starting to change.

So, what resources are most helpful to introduce someone with a Greek background to the subject? I hadn’t looked at Andy Naselli’s article for a while, but upon review I would consider it the best brief introduction to the subject. He also gives his recommendation for resources in this article and orders them according to how he sees it would most benefit an uninitiated reader in the subject.

Naselli, Andrew David. “A Brief Introduction to Verbal Aspect in New Testament Greek.” DBSJ 12 (2007): 17-28.

Next, you can check out Constantine Campbell’s blog series related to his introductory book on verbal aspect. I’m linking to Andy Naselli’s post since the five blog posts are neatly indexed there.

Con Campbell blogs on Verbal Aspect

Last for online resources for now is Rodney J. Decker’s condensation and summary of Stanley Porter’s monograph.

Rod Decker, “The Poor Man’s Porter”

You can also see how Stanley Porter (et.al.) incorporate verbal aspect in their recent introductory Greek grammar textbook, Fundamentals of New Testament Greek. Even if you have already studied Greek at the introductory level this is an excellent resource to have.

If you look through these and trace out the bibliographic material you should be well equipped to enter the discussion.

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One comment

  1. Sandy Grant (@SandmanGrant)

    Andrew, thanks for the links.

    FYI, I found Andy’s intro very heavy going, full of technical vocab and long sentence structures, and by the end of it, I understood what aspect was not. I did not have a clear idea of what it was!

    I found Con’s series of 5 blog posts much easier and had a positive sense of what aspect was by the end.

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